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2 personalization ideas for Apparel

3% of people generate 90% of the impact online, such as views, linkbacks, likes, etc.. This puts “Influencer Marketing” firmly on the to-do list - leveraging the power of those 3% is a valuable strategy for anyone looking to accelerate reach. As consumers are becoming immune to traditional digital advertising, they are demanding a more authentic medium that marketers haven’t turned into a growth machine. Yet.

If you are considering influencer marketing, you’re in good company - 94% of marketers who used influencer marketing believe it to be an effective strategy. Search volume for "influencer marketing" has steadily climbed in the last few years, according to Google Trends.

Here’s the (expected) catch - 78% of marketers said that determining the ROI of influencer marketing is a top challenge in 2017. While some of influencer marketing benefits are clear - it drives engagement and brand awareness - we’re still challenged in making campaigns successful in terms of hard metrics - conversions and revenue.

In a previous post, we’ve covered how predictive marketing turns content into revenue. Let’s walk through 3 scenarios of how predictive marketing leverages the power of your influencer network to drive engagement and revenue.

Use Case 1 - Gap

Gap has adopted a micro-influencer strategy. The #Gaplove campaign recruits anyone who has purchased a Gap product and has uploaded a picture with that product to Gap.com, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest, using #Gaplove. On #Gaplove, users are given a chance to “Shop this Look” and are redirected to the product page.

 

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Gap’s #Gaplove Campaign

You can filter hundreds of people’s looks by women or men, or popular hashtags like #Gapkids, #Babygap, #Gapfit, #Gapxdisney, #Iamgap  - and add yours to the collection. Gap’s pulled off an online style, shop, social and share hub.

What If?

Based on how visitors engage (and don’t engage) with influencer media, a Gap marketer could earmark a visitor as qualified for a marketing campaign. Furthermore they could anticipate the key event that triggers the message. Here are some ideas on how Gap could give their influencer marketing a boost in exposure and turn it into revenue:

  • Collect and store data. First, let’s store every interaction by a visitor to understand their behavior. Imagine that we’re collecting data from the “Toddler” page dedicated to toddler clothing. Based on a visitor journey intercepted via predictive modeling, we can tell that a visitor is highly engaged with the “Toddler” section of the website in a marketer quantified way - they’ve browsed though at least 5 clothing items, read a product review over the last week and are predicted to browse “Toddler” products in the future.
  • Create visitor segments. Using a platform like Intempt, we can specify a target group. We do so by blending past behavior (fact) and future behavior (predicted). For example, we create a segment that contains visitors who have browsed 5 pages of toddler clothing (behavioral property Count of), clicked to see reviews (behavioral property Has Done), have not visited #Gaplove (behavioral property Has Not Done), and are predicted to not add a product to the cart (predictive property Will Not Do Add To Cart).

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Creating a Segment inside the Intempt Platform

  • Time to campaign! Using Intempt Campaign Editor, we create our future campaign in 6 steps by specifying a targeted segment, campaign goal, preferable channels of communication, notification message, and delivery preferences. Here’s what creating our future notification looks like:

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Intempt Campaign Editor

Now, we target currently active visitors from our target segment with notifications at key drop-off points. In this example, a visitor may not get into the segment on their first visit of the “Toddler” section. They might make it in after a few visits. Later, if they return to the store area and browse "Toddler" without visiting the #Gaplove page, they meet a trigger event (for a campaign) which gets the notification out. Here’s what it could look like:

 

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Simulated Scenario - Predictive Notification

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Zooming In

Why this notification at this time?

The visitors’ past browsing and purchasing behavior as well as their current context is indicative of what will happen:

  • They browsed 5 items from the “Toddlers” product section, so we use a relevant hashtag to cater to the visitors’ interests;
  • They are not aware of the #Gaplove campaign;
  • The platform predicted that the visitor is not going to add an item to the cart (Will Not Do Add to Cart predictive property) unless they are influenced, so the “Need some inspiration” notification appears to encourage the visitor to proceed with a purchase later.

If the visitor proceeds to add an item to the cart, we provide them with more than a piece of clothing but also invite them to the #Gaplove influencer community with this message:

 

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 Simulated Scenario - Predictive Notification

 

Why this notification at this time?

  • They have purchased an item after visiting #Gaplove, which is a clear indication of such content being of value to the customer;
  • They are a potential influencer for Gap’s campaign and can see other influencers by clicking a link.

When the visitor follows a suggested link, they are exposed to a relevant selection of styles.

 

Use Case 2  - The North Face 

The North Face sponsors athlete influencers who provide inspiration to fellow adventurers. On the “Athlete Team” section, the visitor can select an athlete’s profile that inspires them to run/climb a little “extra”. The visitor checks out the athlete’s motivation, expeditions, videos and - most importantly - the gear they are using. It’s an elegant way of influencing a visitor towards a product selection.

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The North Face "Explore" Section

Influencer marketing is definitely an aspect of The North Face’s marketing agenda. Browsing the “Explore: Athlete Team” section is both educational and inspiring for those researching possible uses for The Northface gear, and for the athletes' fans alike. A visitor would convert naturally with the ease of product placement and flow to purchase funnel. 

 

What If?

How could The North Face harvest (at scale) the vast amount of intent data that such engaging influencer marketing produces? We’re talking valuable interest data. Based on how visitors engage (and don’t engage), a marketer can anticipate the triggers that will be effective once the visitor is considering a purchase. Here are some ideas on how The North Face could potentially leverage the data to turn initial engagement into (later) revenue.

  • Collect and store data. First, let’s store every interaction by a visitor to understand their behavior. Imagine that we’re collecting data from the “Explore: Athlete Team” page dedicated to Alex Honnold. Based on a visitor journey and via predictive modeling, we can tell that a visitor is highly engaged with the “Climbing”  section of the website in a marketer quantified way - they’ve watched at least 3 videos covering athletes' expeditions over the last week and are predicted to browse climbing products in the future.
  • Create visitor segments. Using a platform like Intempt, where we blend past behavior (fact) and future behavior (predicted), we can specify a target group. For example, we create a segment that contains visitors who have watched Alex’s expedition videos at least 3 times (behavorial property Count of) after browsing “Climbing” section (behavioral property Has Done), and are predicted to not add a product to the cart (predictive property Will Not Do Add To Cart).

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Creating a segment inside the Intempt Platform

  • Set up a notification campaign to target currently active visitors from our target segment with notifications at key drop-off points. In this example, a visitor may not get into the segment on their first visit of the “Explore” section. They might make it after a few visits. What happens after? If they return to the store area and browse gear, they meet a trigger event (for a campaign) which gets the notification out. Here’s what it could look like:

 

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Simulated Scenario - Predictive Notification

 

nf6.pngZooming In

 

Why this notification at this time?

Because the visitor’s past browsing behavior, purchase behavior, and their current context is indicative of what will happen:

  • They watched 3 videos of Alex’s expedition, so we use the athlete's name in the notification to cater to the visitor's interests.
  • They have browsed the Climbing section, indicating there may be an interest in climbing gear, so we suggest to pair the current item.
  • The platform predicted that the visitor is not going to add an item to the cart (Will Not Do Add to Cart predictive property), so the “Free Shipping” offer appears to encourage the visitor to proceed with a purchase.

Keep in mind, this isn’t blanket targeting that clutters the experience. The visitor is not exposed to a wide range of climbing pros. They are targeted with a personalized message based on the athlete with whom they have an affinity. Additionally, they are offered a shipping promotion since the visitor is predicted to not add these items to the cart based on their browsing behavior, and potentially (the model knows) their past purchasing behavior.

 

Final Thoughts

According to the leading mind of Jay Baer, “True influence drives action - not just awareness.” Powered with predictive marketing, your influencer strategy will not only get the exposure it deserves and strengthen your brand, but it will also deliver measurable results.

Looking to increase your conversion rates by delivering personalized experiences? 

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